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Event Preview: Last of the Red Hot Lovers

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In 1969, the play Last of the Red Hot Lovers opened on Broadway at the Eugene O’Neill Theatre. The comedy by Neil Simon finally closed nearly two years later, but not after 706 performances. Several members of the original cast were nominated for Tony Awards. Just a few weeks from now, those in Livermore and the Bay Area will be treated to a live performance of this newly conceived production of Simon’s classic play.

The play gets started as the audience is introduced to the middle-aged Barney Cashman. The happily married father and restaurant owner is essentially going through a midlife crisis. Comedy quickly ensues as Barney looks for something new and different. That change comes when Barney realizes that he wants to experience his secret fantasies and dreams, leading him to have an affair. The 47-year-old tries three different times with different women, but each time, something comes up that prevents the affair from happening.

Over the span of nine months, Barry invites three different women to his mother’s Manhattan apartment. The first two women are pegged as sexually liberated women from the 1960s. Barry’s first is a married woman named Elaine Navazio, who frequently engages in affairs simply because she enjoys the rush. Barry, on the other hand, is nervous and wants their time together to be meaningful. A frustrated Elaine storms out, leaving Barry by himself. Though he promises himself to never be attempted again, he repeats the awkward experience with Bobbi Michele, a younger actress friend and Jeannette Fisher, his wife’s best friend and a staunch moralist.

Last of the Red Hot Lovers takes a variety of themes into consideration, including mortality, the generation gap, an era of drastic changes in accepted standards of mortality, and others. Even more so, Simon’s work examines what it means to grow older and ponder whether or not one has lived life to the fullest.

The comedic plot comes to a close when Barney rediscovers love in the last place he thought to look. In 1972, the play was made into a hit film starring Alan Arkin and Sally Kellerman. Now it’s time to fall in love with it all over again.

Last of the Red Hot Lovers will be performed Thursday, March 16 at 7:30 p.m. at the Bankhead Theater. Tickets range from $35-60.

Things to Know About Our Performing Arts Center

After you purchase your tickets to any of our events, we recommend that you plan your visit accordingly so that your time with us is enjoyable.

Here are several tips when planning your visit:

  • Parking is free! Keep in mind that there’s a drop-off/pickup area located on Railroad Avenue, on the right side of the street, before you reach the stoplight to enter the parking garage. Click here for more information regarding directions and parking.
  • Please be aware the wheelchair accessible seats can’t be purchased online. You must call our Ticket Office for seating arrangements. Our center for performing arts offers handicapped-reserved spaces in the parking garage, an elevator on the main lobby, free assistive listening devices, as well as fully accessible restrooms in the main and upper lobbies.
  • In terms of house rules, the theater lobby opens one hour prior to performance time. Every performance will begin promptly at the advertised time on the event calendar. Please note that no food or beverages are permitted in the auditorium and that we don’t allow photography, video, or sound recording. As a service to others, we will ask that patrons silence all electronics and wireless devices.
  • LVPC requires a paid ticket for every person entering the theater, including infants and children. Though we have a number of family shows, please keep in mind that silence is necessary to fully enjoy the performance and that it may not be best for small children to attend certain events.
  • We offer a full-service concessions area located in the Garden Courtyard Foyer on the east side of the theater lobby to enhance your experience. Choose from a variety of desserts, coffee, tea, juices, soft drinks, as well as award-winning wine and beer. The courtyard includes plenty of tables and chairs, in addition to soothing water and colorful garden paintings.

Event Preview: The Marriage of Figaro

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As the calendar flips to March, we are excited to have another event-filled month at Livermore Valley Performing Arts Center. Headlining the next few weeks will be several performances of The Marriage of Figaro by Amadeus Mozart, the comic opera composed by Amadeus Mozart.

The play takes place in the castle of Aguas Frescas outside of Seville in the late eighteenth century. The opening act begins as the engaged Figaro and Susanna are preparing for their wedding day. Figaro is happy with what will be their new room, however, Susanna is perturbed by the room’s proximity to where the Count sleeps. Susanna explains that the Count has been making advances toward her and plans on reinstating the right of a lord to bed a servant girl on her wedding night before her husband can sleep with her. Naturally, Figaro becomes irate and begins his plot to outwit the Count. The Count, meanwhile, plans to do whatever he needs to in order to avoid Figaro’s traps and sleep with Susanna.

Those aren’t the only characters that the audience is introduced to, though. Along with the Countess, we also learn about Dr. Bartolo and Marcellina. It doesn’t take long to realize that Dr. Bartolo holds a grudge against Figaro. Marcellina, who used to work for Dr. Bartolo, is awaiting for money from Figaro. If the Count’s servant fails to pay on his debt to Marcellina, the two are to be married. The final two major characters are Cherubino and Barbarina. Cherubino, who also works for the Count, is constantly having trouble while dealing with puberty. Barbarina, a teenage peasant girl, has a crush on Cherubino.

There are a number of other plots and sub-plots involved in The Marriage of Figaro. While much of the attention is on the Count, Figaro, and Susanna, the other characters find themselves in predicaments throughout the play as well. For example, Marcellina plots with Dr. Bartolo to prevent Figaro’s wedding. Susanna’s goal is to not only avoid the Count, but also restore his love for the Countess. At the same time, Susanna and Figaro go through a power struggle as their wedding day looms.

As you can imagine, there’s no shortage of madness and comedy in the play. Toward the end, the characters wind up in the garden at midnight in an attempt to keep all their secrets. The Count, ironically, winds up wooing his own wife by mistake. A baffled Count then tries to shame his Countess when he thinks he’s caught her with Figaro. However, it backfires and he turns out to be the one who’s embarrassed in front of everyone. The always patient Countess forgives her partner after he falls to his knees and begs forgiveness. After a wild and wacky day for everyone, the characters are finally happy that things ended in love, and that fidelity has been restored.

Even today, The Marriage of Figaro remains one of the greatest masterpieces of comedy in music. We will get started Saturday, March 11 at 4:30 p.m. with an Opening Night Gala Dinner at Uncle Yu’s. The first showing will follow at 7:30 p.m.

Additional Showings   

  • Sunday, March 12 at 2 p.m.
  • Saturday, March 18 at 7:30 p.m.
  • Sunday, March 19 at 2 p.m.

More About the Livermore Valley Performing Arts Center

For years, the Bankhead Theater has hosted one incredible performance after the next. In its first season, it hosted more than 200 performances and civic events, captivating more than 76,000 individuals. The Bankhead also reached more than 14,000 school children across Livermore and the Bay Area. Our mission continues to be to provide access to performances and events that stir the imagination, creativity, and emotion while serving as the heart of a vibrant cultural arts community.

Our LVPAC Presents series features more than 40 performances each year. We feature a wide variety of live music genres, from authentic western swing and the Great American Songbook to classic rock, smooth jazz, and world music. Of course, we’re also the go-to choice for dance, acrobatics, theater, opera shows and comedy. The Bankhead provides a truly extraordinary atmosphere when it comes to experiencing the arts.

Event Preview: The Chieftains

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In a matter of weeks, the Livermore Performing Arts Center in will be hosting The Chieftains, a six-time Grammy Award-winning Irish band. The Chieftains have earned global acclaim for reinventing the traditional Irish sound.

The group formed in Dublin in November of 1962 by Paddy Moloney, Sean Potts, and Michael Tubridy. Their sound is largely built almost entirely around instrumental and uilleann pipes. The Chieftains are widely regarded as having helped take Irish music across the world to the next level.

At a young age, Moloney had a sense of the sound he wanted to create – a new and unique combination of instruments. The band’s first followers were pure folk music fans, however, the range and variation of their music quickly captured a much broader audience.

It wasn’t until the 1970s that the group achieved success in Ireland and the United Kingdom. They started to gain traction in the United States the following year. Then, in 1975, The Chieftains enjoyed more mainstream attention when they worked on the Academy Award-winning soundtrack to Stanley Kubrick’s film Barry Lyndon.

Over the next several decades, The Chieftains continued to release successful records, while their work with Van Morrison in 1988 resulted in the album Irish Heartbeat. They would go on to collaborate with many other well-known musicians and singers, such as Luciano Pavarotti, the Rolling Stones, Roger Daltrey, Mick Jagger, Tom Jones, Ziggy Marley, Elvis Costello, Sting, and Madonna. In addition to their Grammys, The Chieftains were also given a Lifetime Achievement Award at the BBC Radio 2 Folk Awards in 2002. Eight years later, The Chieftains’ music soared out of this world when NASA astronaut Cady Coleman brought their music to the International Space Station. They celebrated their 50th anniversary with the release of their record Voice of Ages.

The Chieftains, who will celebrate 55 years in November, remain loyal to their roots. That being said, they aren’t afraid to shock the purists and stretch boundaries. Not to mention, the group has a unique ability to play in a variety of environments, from spontaneous Irish sessions to headlining a concert at Carnegie Hall.

Notable Performances

The Chieftains played in a concert for Pope John Paul II, before an audience of more than one million people in 1979 in Dublin’s Phoenix Park. Four years later, they became the first western musical group to perform with the Chinese Broadcasting Art Group in a concert on the Great Wall of China.

Most recently in 2011, they performed at another concert in Dublin, this one attended by President Mary McAleese and Queen Elizabeth II of Britain during her first official trip to Ireland.  

Their original sound is instantly recognizable and remains as fresh and relevant today as when they had their first rehearsals at Moloney’s house.

The Chieftains will be making their appearance at LVPAC Friday, Feb. 17 at 8 p.m. It can be the perfect Valentine’s Day gift for you and your sweetheart.

For the best live music, buy concert tickets at LVPAC.   

Come Enjoy an Evening with Betty Buckley

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Few on Broadway are more respected than Betty Buckley, who has won fans worldwide for her performances on stage, film, and television.

Buckley fell in love with musical theater as a child and chose to leave for New York once receiving her journalism degree from Texas Christian. The next year, she made her Broadway debut creating the role of Martha Jefferson in the musical 1776. Buckley’s career took off from there. You may remember her from her role as the gym teacher Ms. Collins in the 1976 film Carrie. Buckley received a Tony Award nomination for the 1997 musical Triumph of Love, as well as Grammy Award nominations for The Diaries of Adam and Eve in 1999 and Stars and the Moon: Live at the Donmar in 2001.

Possibly best known for playing the original glamor cat Grizabella in Andrew Lloyd Weber’s Cats on Broadway, Buckley is also familiar to audiences as the beloved stepmom Abby on television’s Eight is Enough. Most recently, she completed M. Night Shyamalan’s new film Split.

Over the years, the 69-year-old Buckley has released more than a dozen albums, with the most recent being Ghostlight. This one, which will be the focal point of her appearance at the Bankhead Theater, was titled after the old theatrical tradition of leaving one light bulb in the theater to “keep the ghosts company.” Buckley’s producer and longstanding friend T Bone Burnett described this album’s sound and style as “haunting” and “timeless.” Listeners can tune into Buckley’s take on popular songs such as “Body and Soul” and “Blue Skies,” as well as tunes “This Nearly Was Mine” and “Come to Me, Bend to Me.”

Buckley has received recognition throughout her career. For example, she was named the recipient of the Legend of Cabaret Award in 2004. Buckley was also inducted into the Texas Film Hall of Fame in 2007 and the American Theater Hall of Fame in 2012.

Even today, many still refer to Buckley as the “Voice of Broadway” because of the luminous nature of her voice. It can be heard in Grizabella’s iconic ballad “Memory.” All of us at the Livermore Valley Performing Arts Center are excited to welcome Buckley, along with jazz pianist Christian Jacob. Attendees can look forward to a special night of Broadway music and more to the Bankhead stage.

Playbill calls the performance “Moving, funny, thrilling and all-around entertaining …. Each song is treated as if it were a play unto itself, and everything she touched was as powerful vocally as it was emotionally.”

Variety, meanwhile, describes Buckley as “A consummate storyteller, drawing from the landscape of life a broad and captivating perspective of celestial imagery….Buckley sang with persuasive crystalline textures…caressed melody and lyrics with phrasing that was both descriptively telling and braced by subtle allure.

An Evening with Betty Buckley will be held Friday, March 3 at 8 p.m. Seating prices range from $80-$100.

Whether you’re looking to enjoy live music or an incredible play, be sure to check out LVPAC.

Tap Into the Healing Powers of Art

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When we experience grief, it’s incredibly difficult to try to make sense of our lives. It’s why using the gifts of art, music, and all creative expression can help open up opportunities for growth. Here are five things you can do to heal your grief through creative expression.

Give Yourself Permission to Float

There’s no question that getting quality nutrition, sleep, and support top the list when it comes to getting through a difficult time. But keep in mind that a grieving period is also a good time to be forgiving of yourself when you just want to do nothing. Maybe it’s sleeping more than normal, having ice cream for dinner one night, or even just saying to outside help so that you can be alone. Believe it or not, there’s power in floating in terms of cultivating creativity.

Push Some Color Around

It’s ok to feel like you’re checked out when grieving. But you might want to consider something as simple as coloring just because of how soothing and helpful it can be as you unplug from the intensity of your feelings. Since coloring isn’t goal-oriented, it makes for a relaxing activity during a time of grief. There’s no need to worry either if you happen to cry right in the middle of it. When you look back on those pages, you’ll probably realize that they were essential to your healing.

Make a Sound

Music can be an amazing vehicle to help you work through the great sweeps of emotional shifts you might experience following the passing of a loved one. Whether it’s playing music or coming up with your own song lyrics, this type of art may enable you to believe that we can remain connected to our departed loved ones. It won’t take long for you to realize the healing power in music. Songwriting and music may be your most successful therapy for shifting despair, anger, and other grief out of your body.

Make a Move

Grief can leave us feeling locked in such a deep sadness that it seems like all we want to do is sleep, rest, or sit still. Everyone’s grieving process is different, but consider that dancing can help you feel different and lighter in spirit. Not a dancer? By just getting outside for a while, you will see the beauty and creativity of nature. A deeper appreciation of nature can also help you feel more connected to your loved one.

Make Some Notes

Writing is yet another way to let the power of creativity come into your life. The challenge in this is just writing and nothing else. Don’t worry about editing, grammar, or other things that you may think of when putting pen to paper. Writing for just ten minutes a day can help you make noticeable strides in your grieving process. With a journal, you can even look back and see how far you came. Try to start with one of these beginnings:

  • Today I feel…
  • I remember…
  • I’m so grateful for…

For more on “Art Heals the Heart,” check out this Liv On blog by Beth Nielsen Chapman.

If you are interested in attending one of our upcoming events, click here to see the event calendar for the Livermore Valley Performing Arts Center.  

Event Preview: Giselle

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If you enjoy Russian ballet, then you’ll want to be sure to check out the upcoming performance of Giselle at the Livermore Valley Performing Arts Center. On Feb. 7 at 7:30 p.m., the extraordinary dancers of the Russian National Ballet Theatre stage their acclaimed production of this beloved classic which preserves the timeless beauty of the Russian ballet tradition.

Giselle was first performed in Paris in 1841 and quickly rose to popularity. It was especially popular among audiences in Russia where it has consistently remained in repertory. The ballet tells the story of a peasant girl named Giselle, who dies of a broken heart after discovering her lover is betrothed to another. Giselle is summoned from her grave by the “Wilis” a group of ghostly women who, having been betrayed in love, dance men to death each moonlit night. The Queen of the Wilis commands Giselle to dance her former lover to death, but she instead uses her love to protect him.

Act I

The story begins with Duke Albrecht, a young nobleman, who falls in love with a beautiful peasant girl, Giselle. Albrecht disguises himself as a humble villager named Loys and, hiding his fine attire and his sword, romances Giselle as the village harvest festivities begin.  However, Albrecht is actually engaged to Bathilde, a Countess in the royal court.

A local gamekeeper named Hilarion, who is also in love with Giselle, tries to convince her that Albrecht/Loys can’t be trusted. Giselle’s mother Berthe warns her of the curse of the Wilis, girls who have been unlucky in love and died before they were married.  Giselle ignores both Hilarion and her mother and dances off to enjoy the harvest celebration.

A royal hunting party approaches the village and Albrecht hides. When the villagers come forward to welcome them, Bathilde singles out Giselle for attention. Giselle offers them drinks and dances for them, enchanting Bathilde who gives Giselle a pretty necklace. Hilarion, however, has found the finely-made sword and horn Albrecht has hidden. He reveals the items to the royal party, forcing Albrecht forward.

His identity revealed, Albrecht acknowledges Bathilde as his betrothed. Giselle is inconsolable at the news and, taking Albrecht’s sword, chooses to die rather than live without him.

Act II

The Wilis, ghostly spirits of maidens betrayed by their lovers, dance in the moonlight around Giselle’s new grave. Led by their merciless queen Myrtha, they haunt the forest at night seeking revenge on any man they encounter. They forcing their victims to dance until they die of exhaustion.

They rouse Giselle’s spirit from her grave and induct Giselle into the group. When Albrecht returns to her grave with flowers in hand, he finds Giselle’s spirit and begs for forgiveness, following her into the forest.  The remaining Wilis discover Hilarion who has also brought flowers to Giselle’s grave. They force him to dance until he’s exhausted and he falls into the lake and drowns.

When the Wilis discover Albrecht and begin to force him to dance, Giselle uses her love to protect him until the sun rises. His safety assured, Giselle bids Albrecht a tender farewell before joining the Wilis. Albrecht collapses on her grave to mourn her loss.

If you are interested in seeing this classic ballet live, visit the event page on our event calendar. Explore the performing arts in Livermore with live music, opera, plays and more.

Event Preview: Jesus Christ Superstar

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The Bankhead Theater is proud to host seven January performances of the popular rock opera, Jesus Christ Superstar. Audiences have been captivated by this work since 1970 when the musical began with music by Andrew Lloyd Webber and lyrics by Tim Rice. By 1980, there had been more than 3,300 performances of Jesus Christ Superstar, making it the longest-running musical in West End history at the time.

Today, it’s been professionally produced in 42 countries around the world. With the time of Lent approaching in the coming weeks, Jesus Christ Superstar is a must-see, particularly because the work is portrayed through the eyes of Judas Iscariot. The work depicts Judas as a tragic figure dissatisfied with the direction that Jesus is pointing his followers toward. Audience members love how contemporary attitudes and sensibilities, in addition to slang, are woven into the story. Ironic allusions to modern life, plus a number of anachronisms, are featured throughout the depiction of political events.

Act I

The audience begins to see the concern that Judas has with Jesus. Overall, Judas fails to believe that Jesus is the Son of God and worries that Jesus’ following will be viewed as a threat to the Roman Empire. We are also introducing several other main characters, including Mary Magdalene, Caiaphas the high priest and Pontius Pilate.

At one point, the audience watches as Jesus arrives at the temple in Jerusalem and finds that it is being used as a marketplace for usury, weapons, prostitutes and drugs. The next scene involves an angry Jesus, as well as a Jesus who is overwhelmed with lepers, cripples, and beggars, all wanting to be healed.

The first act concludes with Judas revealing that Jesus will be at the Garden of Gethsemane on Thursday night.

Musical Numbers

  • “Overture” – Orchestra
  • “Heaven on Their Minds” – Judas
  • “What’s the Buzz” / “Strange Thing Mystifying” – Apostles, Jesus, Mary, Judas, Peter, Woman
  • “Everything’s Alright” – Mary, Women, Judas, Jesus, Apostles
  • “This Jesus Must Die” – Annas, Caiaphas, Apostles, Priests
  • “Hosanna” – Apostles, Caiaphas, Jesus, Ensemble
  • “Simon Zealotes” / “Poor Jerusalem” – Apostles, Simon, Jesus, Ensemble
  • “Pilate’s Dream” – Pilate
  • “The Temple” – Ensemble, Jesus
  • “Everything’s Alright (reprise)” – Mary, Jesus
  • “I Don’t Know How to Love Him” – Mary
  • “Damned For All Time” / “Blood Money” – Judas, Annas, Caiaphas, Chorus

Act II

We begin with the scene of the Last Supper, where Jesus asks his apostles to remember him when they eat and drink. He also predicts that Peter will deny him three times and that one of them (Judas) will betray him.

The work proceeds to the scene in the Garden of Gethsemane, where Jesus admits to God his doubts, fears, and anger. The action then picks up even more when Judas arrives with Roman soldiers to arrest Jesus. Panic immediately ensues, though Jesus tells his apostles to allow the soldiers to take him to Caiaphas.

From there, Jesus is moved from the brief trial before the Sanhedrin to be sent along to Pontius Pilate. However, Pilate winds up sending Jesus to King Herod, who asks him to prove he is the Son of God by performing miracles. Jesus ignores King Herod’s request is sent back to Pilate.

The Passion of Christ is soon depicted with Pilate and the rest of the crowd. To keep the peace, Pilate reluctantly agrees to have Jesus crucified. The production comes full circle with the crucifixion.

Musical Numbers

  • “The Last Supper” – Apostles, Jesus, Judas
  • “Gethsemane (I Only Want to Say)” – Jesus
  • “The Arrest” – Judas, Jesus, Peter, Apostles, Ensemble, Annas, Caiaphas
  • “Peter’s Denial” – Maid by the Fire, Peter, Soldier, Old Man, Mary
  • “Pilate and Christ” – Pilate, Annas, Jesus, Ensemble
  • “King Herod’s Song (Try it and See)” – Herod, Dancers
  • “Could We Start Again Please?” – Mary, Apostles, Peter
  • “Judas’ Death” – Judas, Annas, Caiaphas, Chorus
  • “Trial Before Pilate (Including the Thirty-Nine Lashes)” – Pilate, Caiaphas, Annas, Jesus, Ensemble
  • “Superstar” – Judas, Soul Sisters, Angels
  • “The Crucifixion” – Jesus, Ensemble
  • “John Nineteen: Forty-One” – Orchestra

Jesus Christ Superstar will be presented by the Tri-Valley Repertory Theatre Jan. 14, 15, 21, 22, 28 (two performances) and 29. Be sure to check out our 2017 calendar for ticket information, as well as information on other upcoming shows and events.

“The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing” – Edmund Burke

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This is quite difficult for me to write for many reasons.  I enjoy life in Livermore. Since arriving two years ago, I have found the community very warm and welcoming.  However, there have been a few instances when folks have said things that were prejudiced, among them statements that were unapologetically anti-Semitic and others more coded but nonetheless, anti-Semitic. I find this extremely unsettling.

On Wednesday, someone from this community decided to make a statement on the Menorah that is located in front of the Bankhead Theater. The Menorah has been placed there annually by Chabad of the Tri-Valley to honor the holy days of Hanukkah. Vandals placed a barbed wire wreath on top and a white shroud around the center candle.  This was not a silly prank, it was a deliberate act of hatred.

Unfortunately, acts like these have become far too common nationwide. As the heart of our artistic community, Livermore Valley Performing Arts Center will work to shine a light on all types of prejudice– racism, anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, misogyny, xenophobia and homophobia. LVPAC is open to all and we serve the whole community. Just like the Menorah we will continue to burn brightly through the night and the days ahead. With the beauty of art, we hope to not only share the joy that can be found in the world, but change the hearts and minds of people who instead spread the darkness of hate.

Caveat emptor

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Buyer beware.

In this world of internet scams and fake news, a new phenomenon has sprung up.  The unscrupulous ticket reseller.  I know part of this world well, because in the 1990’s I worked for a reputable international theatre ticket agency.  We were a legitimate service that provided assistance with purchasing tickets to performances around the world. Times have changed. Recently, we have been seeing tickets for our shows on resale sites at ridiculously inflated prices.  Unfortunately, this is completely legal, and there is little we can do about it except inform our patrons.  Best case scenario is that a patron overpays for a ticket, but receives one purchased from our box office by the third party reseller, and they enjoy the show.  Worst case scenario is that the patron overpays for a ticket, the third party doesn’t follow through, and the patron is unable to get into the show or has to purchase another ticket.

So, I urge everyone who is looking to purchase a ticket to any events online, to make sure they are purchasing from a reputable box office, if they are not working directly with us.  Here are a few things to look out for:

  • Make sure the price is in line with what you expected to pay.
  • Check to see if there is a physical address associated with the website.  If there isn’t one, or it is difficult to find, that is a sign they may be hiding something.
  • If there is a phone number associated with the website, call it.
  • If you are looking for a hard-to-get ticket (Hamilton comes to mind!), you may need to purchase at a premium from a broker.  Make sure there are confirmed seat locations.  Most brokers who resell hard-to-get tickets have purchased those tickets from the box office and have the seat locations.
  • Check the company’s ratings on Yelp or Google business.

Finally, I ask all our regular patrons, who know how to find us at lvpac.org, to do us a favor. Tell your friends and family to always go to the source for tickets! You can avoid paying additional fees by purchasing through our box office and you can be sure you’ll have a seat when you get there!

David Benoit plays Charlie Brown’s Christmas

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Take a trip down memory lane as Grammy-nominated pianist David Benoit, accompanied by his quartet and Mendenhall Middle School Chorus, brings to life the magical music from the Charlie Brown television specials. Benoit describes this music as “happy jazz” – sophisticated but still filled with fun. His lifelong passion for the work of original Peanuts composer Vince Guaraldi is reflected in his own compositions for later specials and both are featured in this delightful return to a happy holiday tradition.

Joining Benoit will be special guest artist Sara Gazarek whose impeccable jazz vocals seamlessly combine the intimacy of singer/songwriter stylings with the musical and improvisational sara-gazarek-8elements of jazz. With three highly acclaimed CD’s before she was 30, Gazarek has been hailed by The Los Angeles Times as “the next important jazz singer.”

“He understands just how music influences a person’s life and brings out all the characteristics of the human experience. David Benoit is a natural treasure.” – Jazz Review 
“Benoit produced music that was bright, frothy, enthusiastic and totally contemporary.” – Los Angeles Times

Monday, December 19 @7:30pm

Upcoming Events

Thu 18

David Shoemaker

Thu, January 18 @ 7:30 pm
Fri 19

Marc Cohn

Fri, January 19 @ 8:00 pm
Sat 20

1776

Sat, January 20 @ 8:00 pm
Organizer: Tri-Valley Repertory Theatre
925.462.2121

Call 925.373.6800 or email websales@livermoreperformingarts.org for tickets and information